Sunday, January 13, 2008

Leicester Square Station, London


On the winter-time walk along Cranbourn Street that inspired the previous post I also saw this charming reminder of the summer game. Part of the tiling above Leicester Square underground station, it marks the site of the one-time offices of Wisden, the people who produce the yearly almanac that is the cricketer’s Bible. The ox-blood tiles that cover so many of London’s tube stations deserve a post, or two, or their own. They’re the brain-children of Leslie Green, the young architect of around 40 turn-of-the-century stations with tile-clad facades that gave the underground a house style or corporate identity long before these terms were familiar. Leicester Square station opened in 1906 and its resilient tiles have worn well. Thankfully, the Wisden tiles also promise to outwear the recent signage beneath them.

6 comments:

Peter Ashley said...

Blimey, I wish I'd seen that. Will do soon though, mark my words.

Philip Wilkinson said...

Do the ox-blood tiles of London's stations bear any other unexpected bits of signage in this vein? I'll be looking out for them now.

Kalyan said...

Hello Philip,

I stood there to observe the Wok shop (I guess) which stands at the site as I had never ever noticed it passing by so many times on that road. Luckily I looked up and saw the Wisden sign and felt lucky! On googling, I found your blog as one of the first links...nice posts.

Thanks!
Kalyan

Philip Wilkinson said...

Kalyan: Thanks for your comment and appreciation. Many wonderful things can be seen when looking up - especially in London.

philipwitriol said...

Also have to shamefacedly admit to having first noticed this yesterday, ironically through being drawn to the garish wok sign!

Philip Wilkinson said...

Thank you. It took me a while to notice it too (I used to work not far away).